About GSJ

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2012. 04. 01

About GSJ

Geological Survey of Japan

Top Officials

History

Geological Survey of Japan

Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ), AIST is a public organization to carry out various geological surveys and researches. GSJ has consistently provided geological information, which is essential to build a safe and sustainable society, since its establishment in 1882. Three research units, Actie Fault and Earthquake Research Center, Institute for Geo-Resources and Environment, and Institute of Geology and Geoinformation, along with Geoinformation Center and Geological Museum of AIST, are collectively called “Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ)”.


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Top Officials

Director General Eikichi Tsukuda
 
Deputy Director General Yusaku Yano
 
Director, Research Planning Office Jun'ichi Itoh
 
Research Promotion
Geoinformation Center Yoshio Watanabe
 
Outreach and Collection Managemen
Geological Museum Seiichi Toshimitsu
 
Research Institutes
Geo-Resources and Environment Shinsuke Nakao
 
Institute of Geology and Geoinfomation Masahiko Makino
 
Institute of Earthquake and Volcano Geology Kuwahara Yasuto
 
Research Core
Research Core for Deep Geological Environments Yoshio Watanabe
 

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History

1882 Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) was established under the Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce with the goals to make geological maps of the country, undertaking researches related to soils for agriculture and explore mineral resources.
1925 GSJ was affiliated with the Ministry of Commerce and Industry.
1946 Moved to Kawasaki City. Four branches were established.
1948 GSJ was restructured into the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (former AIST) of the Ministry of Commerce and Industry.
Hokkaido branch was established.
1949 GSJ was affiliated with the Ministry of International Trade and Industry.
1952 GSJ was restructured into the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology.
1967 GSJ was reorganized into one central institute and six branches.
1979 GSJ and eight AIST institutes in Tokyo moved to Tsukuba Science City.
1980 Geological Museum opened to the public.
1988 GSJ was reorganized into one central institute and four branches.
1992 Chugoku-Shikoku Center (branch) was closed.
1995 Kyushyu Center was closed. Kinki-Chyubu Center (branch) was reorganized as Osaka Center (branch).
2001 AIST was extensively restructured in April 2001 as an independent administrative agency with integrating the 15 research institutes constituting the former Agency of Industrial Science and Technology, and the Weights and Measures Training Institute under the former Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). As a part of new AIST, GSJ was reorganized into three Research Institutes, two Research Centers, and five relevant sections.

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